Navigating the Child to Tween to Teen Bra Journey with Ease

If you’re anything like me then you have absolutely NO recollection of your first bra-buying experience as a tween 30 years ago. I wish I remembered it as being either a horrific or a pleasant experience because then I’d at least have had a starting point at which to get my daughter comfortable with the topic of wearing a bra. But, no – I had nothing. Not a single point of reference from which to start. Add to that the fact that my daughter is strong-willed and opinionated (not in a bad way, but prominent traits none-the-less) and I was literally at a loss of where and how to start this process.

Enter Dragonwing girlgear. Dragonwing offers a nice progression of undergarments for girls passing from child to tween to teen. Following is an outline of a progression that might work for your daughters.

Un-Tee cami sports top (camisole with inner shelf bra) in 7 colorsI started my process perusing the undergarment sections of stores like Target and Old Navy. I was determined to have my 11-year old wear age-appropriate undergarments that she would still be comfortable being in around her friends and teammates if that situation arose. While I’m sure we could have found acceptable solutions at those stores, I knew that my daughter was also VERY shy and going to a store and picking through racks of bras was not going to be her cup of tea so I bought a bunch and had her try them on at home. She hated how they stopped in the middle of her rib cage and refused to wear them because they didn’t “go all the way down” to her waist. So began my search for a full-length top with a built-in bra. I measured my daughter and started my online shopping research. While on Amazon I bumped into Dragonwing and, as I usually do, I went straight to the main Dragonwing website instead of purchasing through Amazon. I find the main websites have a larger selection of products so I always start there, and then depending on prices and options I may purchase from Amazon if there’s free shipping. I was pleasantly surprised to find both at Dragonwing – free shipping and a larger selection than was on Amazon. A win-win.

The first bra that caught my eyes was the Un-Tee Sports-Cami. It was PERFECT! Not only did it “go all the way down” but it also had a built in shelf-bra that functioned as more than just a second layer of fabric (which is what most cami’s have and they’re useless). It was of a very high quality and after learning more about them I came to understand that some girls can wear these all the way up through 7th or 8th grade!
This bra gave my daughter the confidence to wear it without her belly being “exposed” and got her used to the idea of a bra that cuts across your rib cage – because we all know that’s just a fact…bras stop below your breasts.
She’s been wearing these Un-Tees for over a year now and they’ve been washed a million times. They’ve been a wonderful first bra experience for my daughter.

half-teeAbout six months into her wearing the Un-Tees, I dropped some of the Half Tee Sports Tops into her drawer. The Half Tee is essentially the inside layer of the Un-Tee Sports Camis and they fit exactly the same. I figured that once my daughter was used to wearing the Un-Tee she might migrate easily to the Half Tee and she totally did! Before I knew it she was wearing them all the time – even beneath her gymnastics leotards and I was dreading that conversation because most of the sports bras girls wore under their leotards were uncomfortable to her.

the-keyhole-white-frontAnd, while we’re still on this bra journey together, I am finally comfortable with our path and that my daughter will have a pleasant experience. There are so many other, more important things I want to focus on with my daughter that I don’t want things like wearing a bra to muddy the waters! I’m actually looking forward to her next bra steps – which I’m sure will include either the School to Sport Bra or the Keyhole Sports Bra – and while I don’t know if she’ll remember this experience 30 years from now, I AM confident that Dragonwing has had a very positive impact on my daughter’s life and well-being.
Here’s to you and your daughter starting your journey! Hopefully this was helpful.

Contributed by customer Naomi Marr14199296_10209347712106579_1201097066114495733_n

New Barbie’s Not a Winner

 

Mattel’s recent introduction of three new “styles” of Barbie has received lots of media attention. The dolls are now being made with a variety of skin tones, but most of the attention has focused — not surprisingly — on the new body types: curvy, petite, and tall.

new Barbie doesn't include an athleteA tiny, Barbie-sized step in a positive direction of representing greater diversity perhaps, but the dolls still represent a limited and unrealistic image for girls.

As the founder of a company dedicated to empowering girls in sports and life, I’m disappointed — but not at all surprised — that there’s not an athletic Barbie among these new offerings. In fact, the only one that comes close to being sports-oriented is wearing white platform sneakers and a football-style jersey dress with “Glam Team” above the number. She’s definitely not dressed to play sports.

Maybe soccer or basketball uniforms and sports shoes will someday be sold for these new Barbies, but even then I expect the stylized body size will continue to give girls an unrealistic image of a so-called “ideal body.”

Girls of all ages come in different shapes and sizes, and all of them can be athletes who enjoy the fun and lifelong lessons that sports participation conveys.

An Open Letter to Weight Watchers

oprah-weight-watchers

Dear Weight Watchers:

Thanks to your new spokesperson, Oprah Winfrey, you’ve been getting more airtime and press than usual recently. I’ll add my voice to those, like MSNBC host Melissa Harris-Perry, who feel compelled to look beyond the pitch for a weight loss program and call out the unintentionally harmful messages — subtle and blatant — you’re sending to women and girls.

“I worry, as a mom and as a woman, about the messages our daughters receive if they think a woman as phenomenal as you is not enough unless she is thin.

Who you are, what you have accomplished, how you have influenced and altered the world is all so much more important than your dress size. There is not one thing that you have done that would have been more extraordinary if you’d done it with a 25-inch waist.”
Melissa Harris-Perry

As a mother of a teenage girl and as the founder of a business dedicated to empowering girls in sports and in life, I see the focus on the weight number as a trap.

Like a ball and chain, the notion of a magical goal number on the scale weighs us down and keeps us — women and girls — from achieving our dreams. How many times have we said or heard, “If only I weighed less, I’d be able to [insert goal here]?” Make the team, get into a better college, have more friends, be more successful, be more beautiful, be happier.

My goal is to free girls from the emotional baggage of social expectations on weight and body image. There is no one right or perfect body type; women and girls come in all shapes and sizes. They are all powerful and beautiful.

Oprah has power and influence and is respected worldwide for her business acumen, acting talents, philanthropy — for her humanity. She has earned all that and more because of who she is — not because of the number of pounds she weighs or the size clothing she wears.

But rather than blame Oprah, I’d like to offer a possible solution to Weight Watchers. In this new year, I urge the company to rebrand and refocus its mission and message. Success in life isn’t about watching your weight. Success in life is about emotional and physical well-being; life is about actualizing your potential.

Instead of a fellowship around the scale, how about a fellowship of activity and wellness? Instead of selling prepackaged processed foods, how about promoting nutrition information and healthy cooking classes?

Most importantly, Weight Watchers, I encourage you to change your messaging. While you have male and female members, the vast majority of your messages are aimed at females and feed the toxic media messages about body image that bombard women and girls daily.

What I wish you would say, in a national advertising campaign, is what so many of us say to young women and girls every day:

“You are an amazing human being. You are enough as you are. Be healthy so you’ll live a long life. Follow your dreams and go after the big goals you’ve set. The world needs you — regardless of your shape or size. And I believe in YOU!”

 

Sincerely,
MaryAnne Gucciardi, Founder and CEO of Dragonwing girlgear